Keeping Up With SEO

A client asked me this recently and it’s a fantastic question! After we optimize a client’s website, I’ll always say that it’s important to keep up with SEO even after launch. Simply put, things change online so quickly that it’s imperative you – and your website, blog, social media presence, etc. – keep up.

So….how can you keep up with SEO without becoming overwhelmed?

Check your GA monthly.

Set up your Google Analytics so that you get monthly reports emailed to you directly. Pay specific attention to the keywords visitors use when they come to your website; are they the same ones you optimized for? Are you even seeing the keywords you optimized for in the list? If you’re still not seeing the keywords you optimized your website for 6 months after you did initial SEO, go back and rework things.

Do keyword research annually or even bi-annually.

Google and the search engines change, and so do what your visitors are searching for. By updating your keyword list at least once a year, you’ll be sure to optimize for all of the keywords your audience is using.

Blog and use social media regularly to drive traffic.

Pay close attention to “hot” keywords and phrases your audience will be searching for depending on the season or time of year and incorporate them in the content you create. Blog posts can be especially helpful, as you can create content quickly around a hot, new subject and almost instantly have a blog post show up on Google.

Decreasing Your Bounce Rate

A while back, I wrote about what a good bounce rate in Google Analytics was. What it boils down to is that there is no good bounce rate, because every website or webpage is going to have a different goal. Some sites/pages will have a higher bounce rate because they are more informational; while others are going to have a low bounce rate because they are just one page of many that users want to read through. I read this awesome article too.

Maybe you want a high bounce rate

A high bounce rate is only a problem when people leave your website without doing what you want them to do. Depending on the webpage, it might lend itself to having a high bounce rate. For example:

  • Blogposts tend to have high bounce rates because they are so targeted and answer a singular question the searcher has.
  • Landing pages (from a paid campaign or other type of landing page) force users to make a simple choice: convert (sign up, buy, call, contact, etc.) or leave the page.
  • Well optimized pages that give searchers all the information they need.

So the first question is: is it a certain page that has a high bounce rate (if yes, see above)? Or, is it your entire website?

Maybe you want your bounce rate a little lower

If visitors simply aren’t converting on your website (and a high bounce rate is to blame), there are a few things you can try.

  • Optimize. Whether it’s a landing page or just a regular page on your website, users may have found your website and been led to believe it was something it wasn’t. It simply wasn’t well optimized. Perhaps it’s time to go back to your keyword analysis and reevaluate what you’re optimizing for.
  • Create more pages. It might be that your page is optimized for too many terms. In this instance, users may or may not find what they need because the page has too much information on it. If this is the case, it’s time to create more targeted pages that are optimized for more specific keywords.
  • Don’t forget your call to action. Did you forget to keep it simple, stupid? Make it easy for your users to take the next step and contact you, buy now, or sign up.

So you see, it’s not always about making your bounce rate lower, sometimes you want it to be higher!

If you’re looking for some help with your SEO on your website then visit Jump Online for Glasgow SEO services.